How to do a Wing Foil jibe?

 

A whole session without touching the sea is the promise of the jibe. Jiber allows you to turn around and provides an exhilarating feeling of acceleration. It is also the fundamental manoeuvre to start having fun on the swell and tackle your first waves in WingFoil. Moreover, mastering this technique will allow you to progress in Wing waveriding, and to achieve
Bottom Turn on a wave. Once acquired, the jibe allows to link surfs and edges, without ever leaving the pleasure of the flight. Wondering how to make your first Wing Foil jibe? Here is our advice.

Just like in Windsurfing, jibing in Wing-Foil allows you to turn around with the wind at your back. This manoeuvre is learned before tacking as it is easier to do. Before starting, choose a flat water, without too many people, with 15 to 20 knots of wind, without onshore wind. In addition, it will be easier to start without straps. You are more mobile to catch up with your mistakes and thus to correct possible support errors on the board.

To achieve a successful jibe in WingFoiling, there are two essential methods. The Regular Stance or Jibe to Switch, which requires you to change your stance once you have completed the curve. It is also very simple because you attack the curve facing the wing to exit from the back. The second method is the Switch Stance or Switch to Jibe, which requires you to reverse your feet before initiating the turn. This jibe is the most accessible, as you don’t have to worry about swapping feet at the end of the curve. However, this is very personal. You may feel more comfortable doing a standard jibe on one side and a switch to jibe on the other. It is up to you to test both to see which one is easier for you.


How to jibe in Wing Foil?

Before explaining these two methods in detail, here are some basic rules:

  • Jibe on your natural stance(goofy or regular).
  • Look around to avoid a crash by lifting the wing to see the trajectory in front of the leading edge or by putting the wing in an “umbrella”.
  • Check the wind direction and your speedbefore engaging in the manoeuvre (a jibe will always be from broadside to broadside).
  • In order to switch your feet with as much balance as possible, position the kite a little more overhead to better see your trajectory.
  • To switch your feet, pressing down on the back leg will bring up the foiland thus give you a little more time to switch feet.
  • Engage your jibe by pressing the board on the inside of the curve.

 


JIBE TO SWITCH


To perform this manoeuvre, the feet must be swapped at the end of the curve. The toes should be pressed down to engage the curve.

1. Starting position: To start, you need a good speed. You have to be airborne, stable, with a crosswind. The foil is not too high on the water, to avoid it stalling in the manoeuvre. The feet positioned in the longitudinal axis of the board.

2. Entering the curve: Slightly lower while transferring the body weight to the toes. The board then tilts towards the centre of the turn away from the wind. The wing gradually rises until it is almost horizontal, above the head. The feet remain in the longitudinal axis of the board.

3. Changing the side of the wing: When the wind is downwind, or the axis of the wind is slightly over, the position of the front hand is changed first. Engage a wrist movement to rotate the wing. Then the back hand is released. The wing is rotated with the front hand. The free hand becomes the back hand. It takes over the wing and restores power. All the way through, you keep your support on your toes to continue to enter the curve and gradually get closer to the wide and then the beam.

4. Change of feet/switch position: We have passed the wind axis. The wing is on the right side, we just need to reposition our feet. Above all, don’t forget the little impulse on the back to give yourself some height before the changeover and thus lighten your support on the board. Then the switch is made, a chassé step is taken to swap the front and back feet. The feet must remain centred on the board.

5. End of the curve and restart: You must now pick up speed. The feet return to their original position. The wing leans towards the water. You can pump a little to get the board going again and pump with the Wing if you need to.

 

In summary:

  1. Start your jibe with good speed and a crosswind.
  2. Tilt the board towards the water with the wing horizontal over your head. Engage the curve.
  3. Change the hand position when downwind to rotate the wing, while continuing to enter the curve.
  4. Make the switch. Don’t forget the little impulse on the back to give yourself some height before switching feet.
  5. Restart at the end of the curve by pumping.

 


SWITCH TO JIBE :

This technique consists of swapping feet before the curve. After performing a forward chassé step, the back foot and the front foot are exchanged. The heels are pressed down and the wing is raised above the head to engage the curve.

1. Starting position: This is the same as for the first manoeuvre.

2. Change of foot position/switch: Just before switching the supports, give a small impulse on the back foot to make the board go upwards and thus lighten your supports. At this moment, switch your supports on the board (during the ascending phase of your board). Your board will tend to nose down as your centre of gravity has shifted forward (hence the need to bring it up, which will give you a bit more flight time). This step will give you height and make it easier to relaunch. Once the impulse is given, a chassé step forward is performed. The position of the two feet is reversed. You end up with both heels towards the wing (downwind). The balance is better if the position of the front foot, slightly downwind, (and the back foot slightly upwind) makes it easier to enter the curve.

3. Engage the curve: Press the heels to engage the jibe. The board moves away from the wind. Gradually raise the wing above your head until you are almost horizontal. The curve should be constant and wide. This allows you to maintain speed until you exit the jibe. There is a nice feeling of acceleration when everything works well. Throughout the trajectory, you keep your support on your heels and not your toes to continue to enter the curve.


4. Changing the side of the wing :

The principle is the same as the first manoeuvre. Raise your wing slightly above your head (close to the horizontal) in order to make it change direction. The back hand takes the place of the front hand and vice versa.

5. End of curve and restart: You must now pick up speed. The feet return to their original position. The wing leans towards the water. You can pump a little to get the board going again. Look ahead of you and not at your feet to better control your trajectory.

 

In summary:

    1. Start your jibe with good speed and a crosswind.
    2. Switch your feet after giving a small impulse on the back foot to make the board go upwards and thus lighten your supports.
    3. Engage the curve by pressing down on the heels and gradually raising the wing above the head, until it is almost horizontal.
    4. Change the wing to the sideby swapping hands.
    5. Restart the speed at the end of the curve.

 


How to train :

  • To work on switching: on an edge, practice switching your feet without jibing, and sail in this position. (don’t forget to bring your board up before engaging your switch)
  • To work on the trajectory of the curve: at the beginning, it is possible to engage the first part of the curve and then return to the transverse trajectory and repeat several times without swapping supports. Practice making ‘S’s on the water, concentrating on changing the side of the wing.
  • To work on the rotation of the wing: without switching supports, practice making ‘S’s on the water, concentrating on the positioning of the wing.

 


Advanced tips/pros tips :

  • Look ahead to anticipate your trajectory. (The gaze directs the trajectory)
  • Coming into the curve with the wing a little overboard/with a little more power than necessary. This provides sufficient speed to complete the manoeuvre.
  • A bit of pumping on the exit of the curve allows to restart the board and the flight and to compensate for the lost speed.
  • The curve can be tightened by increasing the pressure on the heels or toes. You have more speed and a greater feeling of acceleration. It is therefore important to remember to lose as little speed as possible during the curve.

 

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